J-Spring 2018

21 Videos

J-Spring 2018: Bert Ertman – Thinking about my doorbell

When the White Stripes wrote their song ‘My Doorbell’ back in 2005, they had no idea it was actually about this very presentation and MY doorbell. “Yeah, I’m thinking about my doorbell, when ya gonna ring it, when ya gonna ring it” And then what?! Well…then I want to ask it who is in front […]

J-Spring 2018: Roy van Rijn – Fostering an evolving architecture in the agile world

What is software architecture? Is it the decision to adopt microservices? Is it the document that describes the layers in your Java EE application? No, every line of code you commit is part of your evolving architecture. During this talk I’ll explain how we, at the Port of Rotterdam, manage our software architecture in an […]

J-Spring 2018: Siren Hofvander – Making cookies healthy. Security in a web based world

Our world has grown more complicated since cookies were first baked into web browsers as a way around state-based obstacles and sessions. In the intervening years they have held everything from unsecured administrative credentials to language preferences and even our window scroll location. But while the wild-west years of plaintext credential storage are hopefully over, […]

J-Spring 2018: Simon Maple – Common vulnerabilities you wish your Java app didn’t have!

This session takes some of the most common vulnerabilities found in the Java eco-system, breaks them down and shows how simple code can exploit them. We’ll look at examples in the wild that have been exposed, some more famously than others, before showing you how to guard against these important security issues. Bio Simon: Simon […]

J-Spring 2018: Ray Tsang – Making Microservices Micro with Istio and Kubernetes

Microservices are here to stay. When applied properly, microservices techniques and culture ultimately help us continuously improve business at a faster pace than traditional architecture. However, microservices architecture itself can be complex to configure. All of a sudden, we are faced with the need for a service discovery server, how do we store service metadata, […]

J-Spring 2018: Erwin de Gier – The definite guide to reactive programming in Java

Everything is reactive. Your application reacts to the click of a button, an incoming message. But also to the result of a database query. Between these events, you want to process other tasks. Being reactive needs a complete approach. Let’s look at the state of reactive programming in Java. Which frameworks are available? Do we […]

J-Spring 2018: Vincent Oostindië – A Journey from Java EE to Cloud-Native Microservices

About a decade ago, when the world was still all about J2EE and WebSphere application servers, Rabobank introduced a new Online platform with a custom, intentionally self-built, portal framework. Since then our world has changed in many ways. Nobody does portlets anymore; instead we build rich front-end applications backed by services spitting out JSON. Like […]

J-Spring 2018: Sebastian Daschner – Java Enterprise applications for the hard production life

Using the Java Enterprise APIs and implementing the business logic is one thing. Running the application against actual production workload and real users is another thing. This session shows which non-functional requirements we enterprise developers need to be aware of to build stable and resilient applications. We will see different resiliency approaches, such as circuit […]

J-Spring 2018: Peter Hilton – Beautiful code: typography and visual programming

The way we visually present code today would do little to surprise the first owner of the 1955 IBM typewriter that introduced the Courier typeface. Since then, we’ve gained little more than bigger monitors, syntax colouring and better monospace typefaces. Meanwhile, layout and typography, already centuries old during the desktop publishing revolution thirty years ago, […]

J-Spring 2018: Frans van Buul & Christophe Bouhier – Choreographed architectures with Axon Framework

Traditional applications are built on an orchestration principle. There is a ‘conductor’ which initiates requests, collects the responses and provides the answer. An alternative is a choreography whereby no single person or group is instructed during the play. Every participant in the dance, knows what to do at which point in time. In Software, a […]